TMK 415 Infiniti Red Bull Racing Renault RB9 German GP 2013




 


We would like to thank our friend Michael Kelly for supplying us with pictures of the kit as well as his detailed review.



Tameo Kits’ latest release is the 2013 Infiniti Red Bull Racing Renault RB9.

After an encouraging start to the season, Adrian Newey developed his RB9 into a truly dominant vehicle, delivering a strong performance advantage over the rest of the F1 field despite the years of relative stability in regulations. Thankfully Tameo Kits has produced a 1/43 model of this purposeful and aggressively styled world champion.
 
The kit follows the design style of recent 2012 and 2013 models, with Tameo’s stunning white metal cast parts used for the majority of components, and a small photo-etch fret for the wing endplates, seat belts and a range of smaller detail components. A key feature of the RB9 is the sections of pearl purple paint. After extensive research and testing, Tameo have provided these sections as transparent decals. They decals look bright (almost pink) on the white backing paper, but when applied over blue, the effect is perfect.
 
Barely 4 months after Vettel’s convincing home-win at the German GP in July, the new kit arrived, and I set to work assembling the model. A self-imposed deadline was to complete the build in the 10 days before the season-ending Brazilian GP….


Following my typical approach, I opened the kit and began by examining and test-fitting all the parts, identifying a natural grouping of components for painting and assembly. I also compared the parts to photographs of the real vehicle, and decided where I wanted to focus my efforts to ensure the most accurate representation possible of the RB9. The front wing on a modern F1 single-seater is a beautiful and complex design. I set about opening some of the gaps between wing elements and thinning the edges of most parts. This work is completed with a file and sandpaper, and to open the wing elements, a scriber is used to deepen the moulded recesses until the slot is ‘cut’ right through the wing. Some other aerodynamic parts, especially the barge boards and the ‘pillar’ vane at the outside of the side-pod entries, were thinned in the same manner. Vents around the rear of the car were also opened with a pin vice and file.

To ensure a colour match between the nose and airbox, I decided to paint both areas. I recall the yellow appearing very bright in person (Australian GP), and Mr Tameo advises the recommended colour (RAL 1028) was checked against the real car. The only yellow I had immediately available was TS16. This is not accurate, but was sufficient to complete this build.

Several layers of TS89 were applied over the balance of the car. This colour is good for 1/20, but the metallic effect is quiet strong in 1/43. Tameo’s alternative of RAL 5013 and pearl clear may be a better option. Decals, including the amazing transparent purple sections, were applied, and the body sprayed with clear.

The rest of the components were all sanded, painted and decaled. The cast wheels are simply beautiful, and respond well to a rub of steel wool. Kit supplied carbon decals were applied to the suspension arms, with carbon decal from various manufacturers used on the camera pods, floor and parts of the rear wing. Some of the supplied carbon decals were oversprayed with ‘smoke’ clear to create a slightly darker look.
 
Qualifying has just finished in Brazil, and most of the components are ready for assembly.

The final step was to complete the carbon section around the exhaust vents. The area was covered in carbon decals, sprayed with smoke, and then flat clear. The area trailing the exhaust vents was dry-bushed with dark gray. Over several hours the remaining parts were carefully assembled. It is sometimes necessary to clean up paint that has accumulated in join areas to ensure a good fit, as well as for a strong glue bond.
 
After about 20 hours of fun, another world champion winner is added to the collection.